How Not to Design Your Own Prom Dress

Here’s an example of how you should not design your own prom dress.

Marche Taylor showed up to the Houston Texas ares Madison High Senior Prom wearing a custom prom dress that looked a bit more like a bikini than a prom dress. When she arrived at the Sugar Land Mariott that was hosting the school’s prom, she was informed that her prom dress did not conform to the required dress code. Marche was asked to leave, but became belligerent and demanded her money back. Due to the confrontation, the situation escalated until the police were called to escort Marche Talyor away. She was not charged.

I know that a few people out there think that Taylor should be able to wear anything she wants to the prom, but that is incorrect. Prom is a school function, and thus subjected to school rules. The school provided a dress code along with the ticket, that is similar to most any other prom dress code. The prom dress code states:

  1. Only one inch of the midsection can be shown.
  2. Bare back are acceptable
  3. Slits in the dress can be no more than three inches above the knee.
  4. See through fabrics should not be in places which reveal private body parts.
  5. Proper undergarments must be worn.
  6. Tennis shoes of any kind are unacceptable.

Here’s the video of the prom dress design gone wrong.

Before I would even get into a critique of what a hot mess this prom dress design is, it’s important to note once again that This student was aware of the required dress code. Furthermore, she was not arrested for her prom dress design, but for her belligerent behavior. She was asked to leave the prom for failing to conform to the dress code with her prom dress. It’s a pretty hot issue, but the issue here is that prom is a school function. Please take note of the code listed above when you set out to design a prom dress, or you could wind up being asked to leave.

Instead, I would opt for one of these great looking 2013 prom dresses seen in this video.

You’re probably not going to go wrong with one of those prom dress designs. For more info on how to design a prom dress the right way, read our prom dress designer’s guide.

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